Bread Secrets: How To Store Bread

bread

How can one resist the incomparable aroma of hot, homemade bread? Give in without worrying about unwanted calories; bread contributes to a well-balance diet. For breakfast, snacks, or for dessert, what an enjoyable way to complete your fibre intake for the day! Nutritional facts about white and brown bread.

Hints & Tips about Bread

  • Bread and rolls taste better and smell home-baked when heated just before serving. Warm in a 400 degrees F oven for 5 to 10 minutes, wrapped in tinfoil.
  • To freshen rolls, place in a paper bag, seal bag and heat in hot oven for 15 minutes.
  • Brown sugar kept in the bread box keeps bread moist and keeps brown sugar from hardening.
  • Instead of wrapping loaves of bread for freezing, package two slices, making it easier to defrost the amount of bread needed, leaving the rest of the loaf fresh.
  • Bread is less subject to mould if stored in the refrigerator, but turns stale more quickly.
  • If bread browns too quickly while baking, cover with brown paper for the last few minutes.
  • Yeast breads freeze extremely well. If glazing is desired, freeze them first, and when needed, heat and glaze.
  • For a highly glazed crust on yeast breads, brush with beaten egg yolk before baking.
  • For soft and tender crust, brush with soft butter or shortening while still warm. Cover with a towel to soften crust.
Previous Post

The Nutritional Facts---Whole wheat bread

Apr 2
The nutritional content of whole wheat breads also varies among recipes, but an average slice of whole wheat bread derives 69 % of its calories from carbohydrates and 15 % from fat because of the oil found in wheat germ.
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Yeast Dough and Baking Tips

Apr 2
Flavour, aroma and texture are the quantities that account for the popularity of yeast bread and rolls. Yeast breads differ from quick bread in that they are leavened by yeast, a living organism, rather than baking soda and baking powder and are often much lower in fat and sugar. When mixed with water and sugar, the yeast ferments to produce carbon dioxide, filling the bread dough with tiny air bubbles

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